Jeffry Hill – Worm Composting

Jeffry Hill is an agriculture professional who offers farmers services that cover all aspects of irrigation, materials and farming.

Jeffry Hill

Regular and in-soil composts create the amendments of intermediate quality. In contrast, composting with worms is a source of nutrient-dense amendments. This happens because worm compost is in essence worm manure. This compost is rich in nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium. Worm composting is also known as vermiculture. It consists of feeding kitchen scraps to red worms stocked in a bin. For this reason, worm composting is a great option for small-scale composters who mainly recycle kitchen scraps. Resulting compost can be ready to use in as little as three months.

The process of worm composting is very simple. Just add high-nitrogen kitchen wastes to the worm bin instead of throwing it out or building a compost pile in your garden. The worms will do the work of turning these scraps into the compost. The biggest disadvantage of worm composting is that a single bin produces a relatively small amount of compost which may not be enough for an entire garden.

Just like every other compost, worm composts need food, water, shelter and air. You’ll have the best results if you think about worm composting as farming worms and not building compost. Take care of worms by feeding them the amount of food they need and keeping the bin in the right temperature and humidity range and the worms will take care of your compost.

Educated agriculture professionals like Jeffry Hill know that worm composts use a specific species of worms called Eisena Fetida. These worms are available online and at some garden stores. You need a pound of worms per cubic foot of bin space.

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